Tag Archives: Summit

STC: Growing in Numbers and Relevance

STC logoIn the runup to the 63rd annual STC Summit, now underway, I posted some thoughts on how the event has shrunk since the late 1990s. The post drew a lot of insightful comments about the Summit and about conferences in general. (I encourage you to read them.)

Two readers — perhaps picking up on my observation that STC membership has declined along with Summit attendance — suggested that STC itself, not just the conference, is struggling to remain relevant.

That’s the issue I’d like to focus on today: How can STC grow in both numbers and relevance?

First I’ll excerpt their comments. Then I’ll add my thoughts. Then I want to hear what you think. Continue reading

Advertisements

Scaling (down) the Summit

Next week, technical communicators from around the world will convene at the STC Summit in Anaheim, California.

summit16The last time the Summit was held in Anaheim, in 1998, it attracted more than 2,000 people — about 3 times the number that’s expected next week. (For that matter, STC’s total membership in 1998 was about 3 times what it is today.)

I’ve attended more than 20 Summits. I love seeing old friends and catching up on what’s happening in the profession.

Still, I can’t help noticing that the event has shrunk over the years. While the program still features some great speakers and great presentations, I no longer have the sense that in every time slot I’m forced to choose between 3 or 4 can’t-miss sessions.

I’d like to hear what you, my colleagues, think about the Summit and about conferences in general. Use the comments section to share your thoughts:

  • Will you be at the Summit this year? If so, why did you choose to attend? If not, why not?
  • Has the Summit, once the pre-eminent technical communication event in North America, been overtaken by other events? (In 1998, for example, there was
    no such thing as LavaCon— or any of the other events with “content strategy” on their marquees.)
  • Do special-interest or niche events, like DITA North America, draw people away from more general-interest events like the Summit?
  • Finally, when you look over the conference landscape and see how much it’s changed over the last 10 to 20 years, do you think things are better today? Worse? Or just different?