Tag Archives: ProPublica

Informing the public, responsibly

The recent flooding in eastern Texas has engendered a lot of news articles. This one from ProPublica stands out because, in addition to covering a topic of interest, it has all the hallmarks of excellent technical writing.

Let me tell you why.

The lede is up front and to the point

The headline itself conveys the major points: Houston’s Big Dams Won’t Fail. But Many Neighborhoods Will Have to Be Flooded to Save Them. Then, in three brief paragraphs we learn that people are afraid the dams at the Addicks and Barker reservoirs will fail, which would flood much of the city, but despite their fears the dams are safe.

The map is well drawn and emphasizes pertinent data

You can see at a glance the seriousness of the situation. There are the reservoirs, and there are the built-up areas adjacent to them and sometimes inside them. (Yes, inside them. Developers have been allowed to build houses within the boundaries of the reservoirs, on land that — most of the time — is above water level.)

Map showing Houston reservoirs and developed areas around them

Map source: ProPublica

The critical spillways (pink dots) are a bit hard to notice, but they’re called out in the article text.

The spillways, the reservoirs, and Buffalo Bayou, the critical waterway to downtown Houston, are labeled. Less essential details are not.

Background information is explained succinctly

On the assumption that most readers aren’t familiar with Houston’s hydrologic history, the writers provide brief summary information, at pertinent points in the story, about why the two reservoirs were built and how the dams are supposed to work.

Content is organized logically, in short sections

Each section heading is a question, like

  • What are the Addicks and Barker reservoirs? and
  • Why are the spillways a big deal? And what will the impacts of using them be?

The questions build on each other. And unlike with most “frequently asked questions” pages, they’re questions that people actually would ask.

Then each section answers the pertinent question in a few easily digestible paragraphs.

The writing is direct and in the active voice

Picking a paragraph at random:

As of now, the Army Corps says there’s enough excess water in the Addicks Reservoir that some of it is flowing around (not overtopping) one of the auxiliary spillways. The agency originally thought water might also have to flow around the spillways for Barker Reservoir, but now projects that will not be necessary as long as the weather stays good.

The tone is balanced

The article’s tone is businesslike yet reassuring. It reinforces the headline: although this is certainly a big deal, and although people who live near (or in) the reservoirs are going to experience flooding, there’s no cause for general panic.

It’s written collaboratively

Don’t miss the byline. Four different writers are credited for the piece: Kiah Collier of The Texas Tribune, Neena Satija of The Texas Tribune and Reveal, Al Shaw of ProPublica, and Lisa Song of ProPublica. Perhaps one of them, or perhaps an unnamed editor, deserves credit for pulling together everyone’s contributions into a single, coherent piece with consistent tone, vocabulary, and writing style.

I tip my hat to all of them for providing the public with information responsibly and in the proper context.

Postscript: I’m always happy to call out instances of good technical writing that I see in general-interest newspapers and magazines. (Here’s another example, about a different topic.) Do you know of any examples? Please share them in the comments.

 

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