Tag Archives: Peter Liu

Mapping space and time

Earlier this afternoon, you arrived in an unfamiliar city. Now you want to get out and do some exploring. Where’s an art gallery? A bookstore? A coffee shop?

On a display board at a bus stop, you find a map of the city with points of interest marked. With a little effort you find an interesting-sounding gallery and see that it’s eight blocks west.

The map in front of you describes physical space. Wouldn’t it be nice if the map answered one more question: How long will it take me to get there?

You’re looking to take a trip, not just through space, but through space and time.

You need a time map. Peter Liu, whose company is called Mapbox, is working to design one for you.

As Peter points out, time maps aren’t new. He even found one from Melbourne, Australia, that was used a century ago. But today’s software creates lots of new possibilities.

Melbourne time map

Travel times from central Melbourne via rail, 1910-1922 (source: Peter Liu)

Check out Peter’s time maps for yourself. I especially like the one that changes based on whether you’re walking, riding a bicycle, or driving a car.

Maps are one of my favorite forms of technical communication. Maps have been around for so long, however, that it seems like we already know everything there is to know about making them.

That’s why the time map caught my attention: it’s a new way of looking at something old and familiar.

What do you think? Will we see more time maps in the future? Can they change the way we interact with the world around us?

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