Lift a glass for Grammar Day

Grammar Day - Twitter hashtagStarted in 2008 by author Martha Brockenbrough, National Grammar Day is a time to celebrate, and foster an appreciation for, clear writing. It’s observed every year on March fourth — the date that, when pronounced, forms a complete sentence.

A few years ago, Mark Allen — of ACES: The Society for Editing — started a Grammar Day haiku contest on Twitter. This year, tired (I guess) of counting syllables, Mark switched the format to limericks.

The judges must’ve liked my limericks. This one took first place:

“Faulty parallelism, you see,
I eschew most assiduously.”
Thus said Constable Brown
As he sat himself down
And ate limburger, ham, and sipped tea.

And this one tied for second:

Old Frumpengruff’s might’ly perturbed
When he hears that a noun has been verbed.
Though it’s gone on for ages,
Still he (18th c.) fusses and (14th) rages —
In high dudgeon that cannot be (16th) curbed.

I’m delighted and honored, of course. But really, it’s all about celebrating clear writing. Take time to read all of the winning limericks — and take time every day to celebrate our language and deploy it in the name of clear communication.


One thought on “Lift a glass for Grammar Day

Tell me what you think

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s